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Shortcrust (postej låg)

This is an unsweetened shortcrust that works very well for meat pies such as my game pie and my pork and chicken pie. You need the shortcrust as the lid of the pie and my piecrust recipe for the sides. You can also just use an oven proof dish and add a short crust lid to it. Can be frozen.

 

Pork and chicken pie

dsc_0640A wonderfully succulent medieval pie that is a perfect introduction of medieval cooking to modern dinners. The pie is made in a casing of my pie crust with a shortcrust lid. The filling is minced pork with fried chicken pieces and fruits dotted throughout.

The original recipe is “Postej med svinekød og høns” based on a recipe from “Forme of Cury” 1390. I have based my version of the recipe in “Middelaldermad” by Bi Skaarup & Henrik Jacobsen p. 105. I have made my own modifications based on preferences of the people present.

Find a recipe for Powder douce @ medievalcookery.com – I suggest to mix a glass full to have some future medieval recipes. Used in moderation it adds a wonderfully complex taste to dishes.

Pebernødder anno 1731

We have a recipe for the Danish Christmas cookie pebernødder from 1731. Here is both the original Danish recipe, my translation and an unadapted printable version.

Pebernødder, 1731
“Tag et pund Pudder-Sucker, et pund fint Hvedemeel, fem Eg, et Lod Cardemomme, et lod Caneel og Muskatteblomme tilsammen, et half Lod Aniis, lidet Peber, tre Lod Suckat, to Lod Citronskaller og mæng alt dette tilsammen og bag det.”
– En Høy-Fornemme Madames Kaagebog, 1731

In English:

Take one pound (467,7g) of brown sugar, one pound of wheat flour, five eggs, a weight (14,6g) of cinnamon, a weight of mace, half a weight of anise, a bit of pepper, three weights of sugar, two weights of grated lemon zest and mix it all together and bake it.

Pebernødder (peppernuts)

A traditional Danish (and German) Christmas cookie that dates back at least to the renaissance. This is not the old recipe though but the modern one we tend to bake for Christmas in my family. This is a large portion, but you can make a smaller portion if you really want to.

Game pie

A renaissance game pie, called a “postej” in Danish.

You can make a simpler version by using a casserole dish instead of the base dough and just add a short crust lid to the dish. It should be good, but doesn’t look as impressive. The dish can be made well in advance and be served either hot or warm or at room temp.

Credit: Casing crust: “Postejdej nr. 2”  printed in “Historisk Kogebog” af Else-Marie Boyhus but is originally from Haldahl’s cookbook from 1883. The top crust “Mørdej uden sukker” is from  “Renæssancemad” by Bi Skaarup. The filling is inspired by recipes from both books.