Kale salad with pomegranate

Last night I made lamb culotte with baked root vegetables (I can not recommend baked turnip) and this kale salad. The rest of the meal wasn’t very historical inspired but the salad was based of one I found in one of my books about medieval cooking. I thought I would share it with you because it turned out to be pretty yummy.

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Awesome food podcasts

I listen to a lod of podcast – mostly about history, science, fiction but lately also about food. I have found two cool food podcast two share with you. I hope you will share other food podcasts with me if you know of any.

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Historien om danskernes mad i 15.000 år

Historien om danskernes mad i 15.000 år af Bettina Buhl

Title: Historien om danskernes mad i 15.000 år
Author: Bettina Buhl
Genre: Food history, Denmark

The scope of this book is kind of impressive – it tries to cover Danish food history. Half of the book is however based around food after 1850 where there are of course more source material. For my purposes that is sadly where I find it least interesting. And I did find that the part of the book that covers pre-1660 is way better – in my opinion. The focus of the book everyday cooking rather than cooking by the elite.

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Kale & Orange salad

I had brought some kale today while out shopping because I am in kind of a medieval mindset right now. When I came home and looked at what else I was planing for dinner (barley frumentry and a steak), the traditional dish of “grønlangkål” didn’t really make sense. I decided to just google kale and see what came up. Luckly aarstiderne.com had a good recipe for a salad of kale, so I went with that. This is my version of that salad. It tasted great with the beef steak by the way.

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Barley Frumenty

Frumenty is kind of a wheat pottage made from boiled wheat with the addition of eggs, broth or milk.

Traditionally frumenty is made with wheat, but we didn’t have any and I like barley better so I made it with pearl barley instead which of course changed things a bit. But I find it quite plausible that people would have made it like this as well. I based my version on the one you find on medievalcookery.com. I also left out the safran on the bases that it wouldn’t have been added in my poor man’s version and it’s really just colouring. I also had to reheat the porridge to thicken it, which the original recipe doesn’t do.

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Puff paste pear pie

As always I was craving sweet this afternoon so I decided to make something sweet after dinner out of the fruit that was sitting around. I had two grumpy pears and a few grumpy apples sitting around as well as some puff pastry in the fridge – which of course meant that I had to do a version of a medieval or early modern pear postej/pie. As fare as I know puff pastry is not really medieval but more of a early modern thing. So lets call it a renaissance pear pie. Yeah that sounds nice. I decided to use a medieval recipe for the filling though. But Denmark was renowned for having old fashioned food tastes, I will call it plausible. Also I really like the taste of powder douce. The renaissance pear pie recipe I was looking at used only ginger and cinnamon though. If I had my postej pastry out of the freezer I would have mead a more medieval pie.

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Blogs and useful links on food history

dsc_0659I love falling down rabbit wholes and I thought I would share some with you. This is a list of blogs, sites about food history and recipe sites. I hope you will find some of them useful as well.

Please let me know if you have a history food blog or know of a site that I should check out.

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